Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Master of health administration online


The economy that is connected with health is actually increasing instead of decreasing like many other business sectors. With the huge Baby Boomer populace hitting senior citizen status, there are plenty of opportunities for people who need quality work with a good paycheck. Also, the health system is the only job in which you increase your own quality of life by directly increasing the quality of life of others, which is highly satisfying to many people.

Everybody is constantly in search of a great position to create a little more income as well as a better lifestyle for themselves and for their families. However, opportunities are scarce in an economy that is still being rocked by the aftermath of the dual banking and housing scandals of 2008. Most people are stuck at a living wage that is certainly decreasing all the time thanks to inflation.

On the other hand, this is not the life that you have to accept. Together with your hard work and the Master of Health Administration online Web programs which could give you your health government diploma, you have a chance to increase your lifestyle without spending hundreds of thousands of dollars. With your expanded set of skills and a few hours spent on a computer daily, you now have an employment resume and educational background that many medical facilities around the world are looking for in a very active way.

On the Web programs tend to be convenient in that they do not require the students to expend gas going to a classroom. There is also no fighting for the attention of the teacher. Classes online additionally usually do not restrict the standard lifestyle of today's modern working individual. In case you have a day job that you have to hold on in order to keep the car note and the mortgage paid in full, then you can definitely accomplish your goal of a higher education without losing money through an online program. You can complete the class assignments on your own time and allow yourself all of the time that you need in order to truly understand the material.

Friday, June 21, 2013

Alternative medicine -1




Traditional medicine is largely mechanistic treating the body as a machine with separate parts to be treated separately. Alternative, or complementary, medicine treats the body holistically, dealing with the whole body in its environment.  In the past alternative methods, many of them ancient have been ignored by physicians. Today, however certain types of alternative medicine are used increasingly to complement traditional methods.

Acupressure: ancient Chinese and Japanese healing massage using fingertips pressure on pain relieving points around the body.  These pressure points lie along the meridians used in Acupuncture. Acupressure balances the flow of Qi or Chi, the energy flowing through the meridians.
Acupuncture: Treatment of illness by sticking special needles into one or more of 2000 specific points that lie along invisible channels called meridians. This ancient Chinese therapy is believed to control the flow of Qi, the energy flowing along the meridians. Used in the treatment of arthritis, allergy, back pain and many other disorders.
Alexander technique: A method used to retain the body’s movements, positions and posture during all activities including sitting or reading. The method, which must be learned from qualified teachers, is believed to encourage good mental and physical health, and resistance to stress, by promoting harmony between mind and body.
Aromatherapy:  Use of concentrated plant oils such as bergamot, eucalyptus or rosemary to treat conditions including stress, headaches and arthritis. Extracts, or essential oils, are massaged into the skin by aroma therapists; they can also be inhaled or added to baths.

Art therapy: Use of drawing and painting to encourage patients to explore and resolve deep seated fears and emotions that they find difficult to express in words. Used to treat addiction, alcoholism, anorexia and other conditions.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Immunization



While immunity is being acquired a person develops symptoms of the disease. But some infections can be prevented b allowing the body to acquire active immunity artificially. This is achieved by the introduction into the body of a vaccine made from dead or weakened micro organisms that are no longer capable of causing the disease itself. When injected into the skin or blood stream9 Or, as in the case of polio vaccine, swallowed) they stimulate B-lymphocytes to produce antibodies but no significant disease symptoms. And if, or when, the body encounters the real disease causing micro organism, it is already protected against infection because the memory cells immediately produce antibodies. Booster shots may be needed at later dates to ensure the active immunity is still effective. Vaccines are available against many formerly dangerous diseases including polio, measles and diphtheria. Immunization programmes for children have virtually eliminated most common childhood diseases, and confer immunity into adult life. But vaccination is advisable for travelers to countries where they may contract potentially fatal diseases not previously encountered.


Sometimes antibodies themselves, from external sources, are injected into the body to provide protection without stimulating the immune system. This is called artificial passive immunity and is useful in providing instant protection where a disease might kill the person before their active immune system has time to come into operation. Examples include gamma globulin, given against hepatitis A infection; am antitoxin to treat tetanus; and anti rabies injection.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Allergies and Cancer


Allergies

Sometimes the immune system overreacts to a particular substance called an allergen, producing an allergy. This may result from eating certain foods, inhaling particles or exposure of the skin to chemicals. Common allergies include asthma, hay fever, urticaria, farmer’s lung, food allergies and contact dermatitis. Treatments include avoiding allergens and antihistamine drugs. In some cases anaphylactic shock the body reacts so violently to an allergen, such as a wasp sting, that without treatment the patient may die.

Cancer

The body’s tissue cells constantly divide and replace themselves. Some times “rouge” cells divide out of control to produce an abnormal tissue growth or malignant tumor. Diseases involving these tumors are called cancers. If untreated, cancer cells spread from the tumour via the blood stream to other parts of the body where they produce secondary tumours. Eventually, cancer cells overwhelm the body and the patient dies. The risk of developing a cancer may be inherited, or it may be increased by smoking, drinking alcohol or exposure to chemicals. Cancer affects around 25 percent of people in the western world at some point in their lives and is the second most common cause of death after heart disease. Different types of cancers do not occur with the same frequency worldwide. This uneven distribution points to the involvement of environmental factors- such as food intake, smoking or exposure to ultra violet light- as causes of cancer. For example, stomach cancer in Japan and Chile is believed to be related to diets high in salted and pickled food.

Monday, March 18, 2013

Infectious And Non Infectious Diseases

 
Infectious Diseases

 Infections arise when disease causing micro organisms penetrate the body’s physical defenses such as the skin and entire bloodstream and tissues near their route of entry can be by infection of infected droplets, ingestion of contaminated food or water, entry through broken skin, skin to skin contact, injection by needle or other sharp object, sexual contact, insect bites, or by transmission from mother to fetus. In most of the case the body immune system acts to destroy the invading micro organism before it can do harm. Most disease signs and symptoms such as spots in measles- are indicators of the battle between the micro organism and the body’s immune system. In rare cases, the infection may be so virulent that kills the patient before the immune system has time to fight back. Before the 20th century infectious diseases were a major cause of deaths in the world. In developed countries today, deaths from infectious disease have been dramatically reduced, and non infectious diseases such as cancers and heart disease have taken over as major killers. This reduction has been achieved by better public health and sanitation; the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs; and the use of vaccines.

However there is no room for complacency since old diseases such as TB, malaria are again on the increase, some bacteria are now resistant to drugs; many viral conditions are untreatable and new diseases such as AIDS are appearing. Disease causing organisms include viruses, with are non living infectious agents; single celled organisms including bacteria, chlamydiae, rickettsiae, fungi and protists, and multicellular organisms such as parasitic worms. Viruses consist of genetic material surrounded by a protein coat, and cause diseases such as measles, mumps and rabies. Viruses have to invade host cells to reproduce. They lose their outer protein coat and use the host cell’s DNA to replicate their genetic materials. A protein coat is constructed around the rebuilt genetic material and newly formed viruses burst out of the host cell or exit in an envelope and invade other host cells to multiply further.

Non Infectious Diseases 

Non infectious diseases are now the major cause of death in the developed world. The reason for this is that many infectious diseases are now treatable with drugs. Also the incidence of non infectious diseases increases with age, and averaged life expectancy is increasing. Non infectious diseases include circulatory diseases including heart attacks and strokes, in which the blood vessels to the heart or brain becomes blocked; cancers diabetes mellitus, which is the body’s inability to control blood sugar levels; nervous system diseases such as motor neuron disease; respiratory system diseases digestive system diseases ; kidney diseases and allergies. On average, infectious diseases are responsible for just five deaths per 100000 of the population per year in the developed world, as compared with nearly 1000 deaths per 100000 caused by major non infectious diseases.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Immunization


While immunity is being acquired a person develops symptoms of the disease. But some infections can be prevented by allowing the body to acquire active immunity artificially. This is achieved by the introduction into the body of a vaccine made from dead or weakened microorganisms that are no longer capable of causing the disease itself. When injected into the skin or bloodstream (or as in the case of polio vaccine, swallowed) they stimulate B lymphocytes to produce antibodies but no significant disease symptoms. And if, or when, the body encounters the real disease causing microorganisms, it is already protected against infection because the memory cells immediately produce antibodies.

Booster shots may be needed at later dates to ensure that active immunity is still effective. Vaccines are available against many formerly dangerous diseases including polio, measles an d diphtheria. Immunization programmes for children have virtually eliminated most common childhood diseases, and confer immunity into adult life. But vaccination is advisable for travelers to countries where they may contract potentially fatal diseases not previously encountered. Sometimes antibodies themselves from external sources are injected into the body to provide protection without stimulating the immune system. This is called artificial passive immunity and is useful in providing instant protection where a disease might kill the person before their active immune system has time to come into operation. Examples include gamma globulin, given against hepatitis A infection; anti toxin to treat tetanus; and anti rabies injections.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Diets and Dieting!


The word diet is commonly used these days to describe an eating regime followed by someone in order for him or her to lose weight, even though in its correct usage the word simply describes what we eat each day. A diet designed for weight loss is better described as a slimming diet, and there are many of these to choose from. As the percentage over weight and obese children and adults in the western world steadily increases as a result of increased in activity and increased consumption of junk food – so new slimming diets, and books on slimming, become available in order to commercially exploit fatness. However, most of these diets are not effective because they fail to promote long term weight loss and in fact may well cause the slimmer to end up fatter and heavier than when they started the diet. Being overweight will of course affect an individual’s health and reducing body weight will help to reduce those health risks. But to be healthy, a diet designed to reduce body weight needs to be in tune with the body’s physiology.

 An effective diet should promote the loss of fatty or adipose tissue from the body so that its overall fat content is reduced. To do this successfully, the dieter should eat a well balanced high carbohydrate, high fiber low fat diet with energy content of between 1200 and 1500 calories per day, combining this with regular exercise. This should cause a weight loss of 0.45 to 0.95 KG per week, that weight loss being mainly in the form of fat. At the same time, exercise will build up muscle tissue which pound for pound consumes far more energy than fat does as well as increasing metabolic rate, the rate at which the body burns carbohydrates and fat to release energy. Once the desired weight has been reached – and the body fat content has been reduced to within safe limits- then the dieter can gradually increase his or her calorie consumption while maintain the same balance of foods in order to keep at the weight for life.

Other sliming diets put the body in a defensive stance. Because its calorie intake has been severely reduced the body reduces its metabolic rate to conserve its fat energy reserves and actually burns lean muscle tissues in order to provide energy. When the diet stops the body diverts as much spare food energy as possible to build up its fat reserves in case another calorie famine happens and in consequence the diet regains lost weight and ends with more fat than before